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Notice to Trade on Harvesting of Scallops in Ireland
Friday, October 11, 2013/Number of views (2698)

With effect from Monday 14th October 2013, scallops harvested from within existing Classified Shellfish Production Areas will be subject to the Irish Shellfish Biotoxin Monitoring Programme, and can only be harvested from production Areas that are on an Open or a Restricted Biotoxin status. Scallops are a Bivalve Species which are harvested by Irish Fishermen primarily from offshore wild fisheries, and by the inshore fleet from a number of classified production Areas such as Roaringwater Bay, Dunmanus Bay Bantry Bay, Kenmare Bay, Kilkieran Bay and Clew Bay etc.The Notice to Trade in the link below explains the protocols in separate sections for the testing and recording of Scallops harvested from both Off-shore sites and from Existing Classified Production Areas. Notice to Trade on the Harvesting of Scallops.pdf

Major Change for Scallops Harvested from Classified Production Areas:

WEF Monday 14 October 2013.In order to obtain either an open or restricted biotoxin status for scallops from classified production areas, two samples of (12-15 Live Scallops) taken more than 48hours apart and less than 12 days apart are required to be sent with a correctly completed label via An Post Courier Service directly to the Biotoxins Unit, Marine Institute, Rinville, Oranmore, Co Galway.

Sampling Frequency for Scallops from Classified Production Areas: - Fortnightly

Once a production area is on an open or restricted (where only shucked scallops can be placed on the market for human consumption) biotoxin status for scallops, there after one sample per fortnight is required to maintain the biotoxin status for that production Area.

The Marine Institute has amended their HABs database to record all shellfish reports on one page, and will record if Scallops are harvested from either a Classified or Non classified production Area - MI HABs database

NB In order to avoid duplicate samples, and rejection of samples for exceeding the fortnightly sampling frequency originating from different boats fishing from the same classified production areas, Scallop processors or approved dispatch centres handling scallops from classified production areas should identify Fishing vessels that will be responsible for the collecting of scallop samples and of phytoplankton samples.


Rules Governing Bluefin Tuna in Ireland
Thursday, October 03, 2013/Number of views (2002)

The Sea-Fisheries Protection Authority (SFPA) has released updated information in relation to the recreational catches of Bluefin tuna in Ireland. European fisheries regulations governing the catching, landing and sale of Bluefin tuna states that unless a Member State has specifically assigned a portion of their annual national quota to sports and recreational fisheries to target these fish no such fishing can take place.

EU annual fisheries quotas designate no national Bluefin tuna quota to Ireland and while commercial fishing vessels targeting the smaller albacore tuna in the summer fishery can avail of incidental by-catch under a shared European by-catch provision, in Ireland and for Irish fishers, no directed fishery for Bluefin Tuna, even by means of sea-angling is permitted.

Susan Steele, Chair of the SFPA said: “Ireland does not have a direct fishery for Bluefin Tuna in Ireland.  Ireland does have a 1% by catch of Bluefin Tuna as part of the Northern Albacore fishery.  The vessels that partake in the Northern Albacore fishery must obtain a specific fishing authorisation from the Department of Agriculture, Food & Marine.  For anyone engaged in sports or recreational sea angling this means that if a Bluefin Tuna is caught while sea angling it has to be immediately released as the fish cannot be targeted or landed by an Irish boat.'

Fisherman Ordered to Pay Donation to Conservation Group for Landing Endangered Species
Friday, July 12, 2013/Number of views (2709)
A Judge ruled that the State’s case was proven at a recent case brought before Donegal Town District Court - Mr Shane Curran, the Master of the fishing vessel the Velvet Chord II, was ordered to pay €500 to a conservation group. The case was in relation to a suspected landing of common skate, an endangered species under EU Regulation, by the Velvet Chord II on the 19th August 2011 in Killybegs. 

Sea-Fisheries Protection Authority to Host EU Meetings on Fisheries Control
Thursday, May 16, 2013/Number of views (2332)
The Sea-Fisheries Protection Authority (SFPA) will host a series of EU Fishery Control focussed meetings involving fishery control experts from the relevant authorities in various EU Member Sates...

Sea-Fisheries Protection Authority to Host EU Meetings on Fisheries Control Sea-Fisheries Protection Authority to Host EU Meetings on Fisheries Control
Tuesday, April 16, 2013/Number of views (2273)
The Sea-Fisheries Protection Authority (SFPA) will host a series of EU Fishery Control focussed meetings involving fishery control experts from the relevant authorities in various EU Member Sates...

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